Lakish, Chavez in court


SAGUACHE — Judge Patrick Hayes presided over hearings for William Alder Lakish, Crestone, and Ruben Chavez, Center, Tuesday in Saguache District Court. Lakish’s case was bound over to district court from county court and Chavez continues to process through the court system following a felony charge filed against him last year.
Lakish appeared first and as he has in past hearings, continued to represent himself. Judge Hayes read the following charges against him: Forgery, a class five felony, punishable by three years in prison, a $100,000 fine or both with six years for aggravating circumstances and criminal impersonation, a felony six charge, punishable by 18 months in prison and a $100,000 fine or both with three years for aggravating circumstances.
The problems for Lakish began when he filed as a “registered agent” for the White Eagle LLC (lodge) May 11, 2017 without permission of the owners. He has lived in the condemned building ever since despite notice to vacate the premises, but recently left on his own accord, owners Brian Kramer and Julie O’Halloran said.
Lakish told the judge he was assured in county court that if he left the White Eagle and appeared in district court the charges would be dropped. Hayes told Lakish he had no right to have his case heard in county court with felony charges and to forget about county court.
At one point Hayes warned Lakish, who kept insisting he should have the charges dropped, not to interrupt him when he was speaking. Lakish also began accusing people involved in the case of various actions. “I am not going to allow you to accuse people in my court room,” Hayes commanded Lakish. “I understand you are upset but you are not going to use this as a public forum.”
“My understanding of forgery is that I would have to sign someone else’s name, not mine,” Lakish said, protesting he did not understand the charges against him and how he could be guilty of forgery. Hayes explained that Lakish’s understanding of the legal definition of forgery was not necessarily true but declined to discuss the facts in the case.
Hayes told Lakish he had the right to remain silent, to enter a plea and the right to a jury trial, also the right to be represented by counsel. Lakish told the judge he does not qualify for a public defender and would be representing himself. Hayes replied that it is not a good idea for Lakish to proceed without representation and pointed him to the clerk of the court to help obtain documentation for his case.
Lakish kept arguing but Hayes simply told him he would give him extra time to find an attorney and gather his documentation. “These charges are serious and I urge you to obtain counsel,” Hayes concluded. He set Lakish’s next hearing for May 22.


Ruben Chavez
Chavez and his wife Audrey were served with a summons and complaint by the Saguache Sheriff’s Office Sept. 23, 2017. The incident in question happened Aug. 14 and 15, 2017 on the couple’s private rental property, a mobile home at 162 West First St., no. 3, in Center. The charges involve an allegedly illegal eviction witnessed by Center Police.
Chavez is being represented by attorney Raymond Miller and was assisted by an interpreter. Hayes told Chavez that he is charged with second-degree burglary, a class three felony, punishable by 16 years in prison and a $750,000 fine or both. Aggravated charges could mean Chavez would serve up to 32 years in prison. A second charge, criminal mischief, a class one misdemeanor, carries a sentence of 18 months in the county jail, a $5,000 fine or both.
Miller told Hayes the district attorney had offered to defer the misdemeanor charge. Chavez entered a pela of not guilty and Miller requested a jury trial for his client. The next court date for Chavez is Sept. 12.


Lakish appeared first and as he has in past hearings, continued to represent himself. Judge Hayes read the following charges against him: Forgery, a class five felony, punishable by three years in prison, a $100,000 fine or both with six years for aggravating circumstances and criminal impersonation, a felony six charge, punishable by 18 months in prison and a $100,000 fine or both with three years for aggravating circumstances.
The problems for Lakish began when he filed as a “registered agent” for the White Eagle LLC (lodge) May 11, 2017 without permission of the owners. He has lived in the condemned building ever since despite notice to vacate the premises, but recently left on his own accord, owners Brian Kramer and Julie O’Halloran said.
Lakish told the judge he was assured in county court that if he left the White Eagle and appeared in district court the charges would be dropped. Hayes told Lakish he had no right to have his case heard in county court with felony charges and to forget about county court.
At one point Hayes warned Lakish, who kept insisting he should have the charges dropped, not to interrupt him when he was speaking. Lakish also began accusing people involved in the case of various actions. “I am not going to allow you to accuse people in my court room,” Hayes commanded Lakish. “I understand you are upset but you are not going to use this as a public forum.”
“My understanding of forgery is that I would have to sign someone else’s name, not mine,” Lakish said, protesting he did not understand the charges against him and how he could be guilty of forgery. Hayes explained that Lakish’s understanding of the legal definition of forgery was not necessarily true but declined to discuss the facts in the case.
Hayes told Lakish he had the right to remain silent, to enter a plea and the right to a jury trial, also the right to be represented by counsel. Lakish told the judge he does not qualify for a public defender and would be representing himself. Hayes replied that it is not a good idea for Lakish to proceed without representation and pointed him to the clerk of the court to help obtain documentation for his case.
Lakish kept arguing but Hayes simply told him he would give him extra time to find an attorney and gather his documentation. “These charges are serious and I urge you to obtain counsel,” Hayes concluded. He set Lakish’s next hearing for May 22.


Ruben Chavez
Chavez and his wife Audrey were served with a summons and complaint by the Saguache Sheriff’s Office Sept. 23, 2017. The incident in question happened Aug. 14 and 15, 2017 on the couple’s private rental property, a mobile home at 162 West First St., no. 3, in Center. The charges involve an allegedly illegal eviction witnessed by Center Police.
Chavez is being represented by attorney Raymond Miller and was assisted by an interpreter. Hayes told Chavez that he is charged with second-degree burglary, a class three felony, punishable by 16 years in prison and a $750,000 fine or both. Aggravated charges could mean Chavez would serve up to 32 years in prison. A second charge, criminal mischief, a class one misdemeanor, carries a sentence of 18 months in the county jail, a $5,000 fine or both.
Miller told Hayes the district attorney had offered to defer the misdemeanor charge. Chavez entered a pela of not guilty and Miller requested a jury trial for his client. The next court date for Chavez is Sept. 12.


Video News
More In Homepage